Mount Pelmo, the throne of God.

THIS AWE-INSPIRING MOUNTAIN IN THE SHAPE OF A THRONE IS ACTUALLY KNOWN IN THE LOCAL DIALECT AS “EL CAREGÓN DE ‘L PADRETERNO”, LITERALLY “THE THRONE OF THE ETERNAL FATHER”. 

You can see a ridge with the “south shoulder” and the “east shoulder” from the southeast which are like armrests, with Valòn, an ancient glacial cirque, in the centre.

Legend has it that God, exhausted by his efforts to create the stunning Cadore mountains, completed his task with Pelmo so he could finally rest.

The mountain has two main massifs: Pelmo (3168 m) in the centre and Pelmetto (2990 m) towards the west, separated by a canyon. It is home to three Alpine refuges: the Venezia Refuge – Alba Maria De Luca (1947 m, to the east), the Città di Fiume Refuge (1918 m, to the northwest) and the Passo Staulanza Refuge (1766 m, to the west).

Pelmo also has its fair share of history. At the foot of Pelmetto, at 2050 m and not far from the Staulanza Refuge, is one of the most extraordinary paleontological sites in the Dolomites. On an enormous collapsed rock you can see the footprints left by dinosaurs on their prehistoric “walks”.

You can go round Pelmo by following a 12 km circuit (of medium-difficult level with a difference in height of 700-800 m). The starting point is the pass of Forcella Staulanza, where it is easy to park; you climb the ancient Tríòl dei Cavai which goes along the western part of Pelmetto (which then leads to the rock with the dinosaur footprints). Continue along the south side of the mountain until you reach the grazing area Le Mandre with its magical scenery. Continue through the I Lach area and go round the great southeastern ridge of Pelmo until you get to another grazing area, Campi di Rutorto, and from there the Venezia Refuge with its breathtaking views over Cadore and Ampezzo. Continue along the Flaibani path as you climb the Forcella di Val d’Arcia then descend to the Città di Fiume Refuge, ending up where you started at Forcella Staulanza.

Dolomites are a living legacy